Recreate React from the ground up

Matt Greer:

In this five part series, we will “recreate” React from the ground up, learning how it works along the way. Once we’ve finished, you should have a good grasp of how React works, and when and why it calls the various lifecycle methods of a component.

What a great way to get an understanding of how React works.

Design Your Personal Growth

Melissa Mandelbaum:

In recent conversation, I discovered many of my friends are trying to grow, but struggling to make progress. I dug deeper and realized, growth frameworks are not widely known or practiced.

While these may sound like a chore to do I believe most people need some help with guidance of their career.

High Performance React: 3 New Tools to Speed Up Your Apps

Ben Edelstein:

React is usually pretty fast, but it’s easy to make small mistakes that lead to performance issues. Slow component mounts, deep component trees, and unnecessary render cycles can quickly add up to an app that feels slow.
Luckily there are lots of tools, some even built in to React, that help with diagnosing performance issues. In this post I’ll highlight tools and techniques for making React apps fast. Each section also has an interactive, and (hopefully) fun demo!

I Got Hacked and All I Got Was This New SIM Card

Justin Williams :

I like to think I take an above average amount of steps to secure myself online: I use a password manager, unique passwords as complex as the site will allow, and turn on 2-factor authentication when possible. A true security expert will likely find some sort of flaw in my setup, but I’ll argue that I am doing more than 95% of the planet.

So how did I, someone who is reasonably secure, have his cell phone disabled, his PayPal account compromised, and a few hundred dollars withdrawn from his bank account?

Even when you do the right things to increase your security, social engineering can bypass it all.

Facebook, for the First Time, Acknowledges Election Manipulation

Graham Kates:

Without saying the words “Russia,” “Hillary Clinton,” or “Donald Trump,” Facebook acknowledged Thursday for the first time what others have been saying for months.

In a paper released by its security division, the company said “malicious actors” used the platform during the 2016 presidential election as part of a campaign “with the intent of harming the reputation of specific political targets.”

If you need another reason to leave Facebook, this is a pretty good one.

If they had done something about it prior to the election maybe the world wouldn’t be in the position it is now.

TVNZ to Live Stream Free-to-Air Channels

Stuart Corner:

TVNZ has started live streaming its free-to-air channels along with its Duke on-demand service via a revamped tvnz.co.nz web site, and has promised to make the service available on Apple TV and on Google’s Chromecast.

Finally Apple TV and Chromecast support.

Announcing TypeScript 2.4 – Dynamic Import Expressions 

Daniel Rosenwasser:

Dynamic import expressions are a new feature in ECMAScript that allows you to asynchronously request a module at any arbitrary point in your program. These modules come back as Promises of the module itself, and can be await-ed in an async function, or can be given a callback with .then.

What this means in short that you can conditionally and lazily import other modules and libraries to make your application more efficient and resource-conscious.

A great new feature for ECMAscript now available in TypeScript.